Hard Data on 5.56 vs .223 Chamber Pressures

When I started this blog, it was to put out good information, reliable information that every shooter could use. I didn’t want to dumb down what I put out so that the bottom 10% could understand it, and I didn’t want to make it so technical and hard to read that only the top 10% could understand it or cared enough to try to understand it.

I understood from the outset that people might take my opinions and advice into consideration when making purchases, so I’ve focused on being right above all else. I’ve tried to be concise, because your time is valuable, but some things just require additional explanation. I try to attack problems from a number of sides – the technical, as I am reasonably intelligent and have an eye for detail, but also the practical, for I have been deployed and understand what’s really important about gear or firearms that might see hard use.

The reaction has been overwhelmingly positive, and I’ve reaped amazing and wholly unexpected benefits from my efforts. One thing I didn’t expect was getting a job with a big internet retailer of ammo – LuckyGunner. Among other things, I have recently become the most visible part of the team for their new blogging effort. The new LuckyGunner Labs is a project that will, among interesting stuff put out by some of my coworkers, allow me to create and research and test things that I basically didn’t have the resources to do on my own.

I say “me” and “I” – but it’s not just me. Having people with an eye for perfection (and the power to withhold a paycheck!) look over my work with a critical eye has improved the quality of what I put out by leaps and bounds. And the other people I work with are very skilled – working with Chris, who makes great videos, has definitely forced me to step up my game on that front.

The first big project (and it has been a BIG project) is an in-depth look at what the real differences between 5.56 and .223 are. It’s a topic that I have been considering and experimenting with for years, but without hard data, my lone voice would have been lost in a sea of opinions on the internet. Thanks to LG – and Paul and Brian and Maciej, who I have been working closely with for months – not only has the technical aspect of the content been thoroughly researched, but it’s packaged in such a way that it should appeal to a broad audience, and manageable enough for the vast majority of shooters to understand, should they take the time to do so.

I would not be a good person if I didn’t mention the assistance of other folks, outside of LG, who helped make this report what it is. Firearms historian Daniel E. Watters of TheGunZone provided a lot of historical and technical information, as well as insight into the project. Cagen and Thad of Barnes Bullets were invaluable in their assistance in verifying the pressure data and went several extra miles in conducting additional pressure testing with their equipment. I can’t remember the name of the ballistician at H.P. White, my apologies – but he was extremely helpful and insightful, too. My friends Zach, Nick, Caleb, and Aaron proof-read early drafts of the article or offered technical assistance, and Mike the rocket scientist very rightly tore apart the way I had written it the first time around.

I certainly hope that this will continue for the time being – I don’t see myself as a gun blogger or gun journalist for life, but I’m not done yet.